Welcome to discussion room on "Providing augmented services and advisory solutions (mandated and on demand)".


Increasingly complex operational settings and unprecedented needs risk jeopardizing humanitarian and development outcomes; to safeguard and achieve these, WFP must continue to enhance and broaden its capacity to serve as a partner of choice, supporting and enabling others to deliver on their mandates.


Leveraging its strategic alignment to the 2030 Agenda, engagement in the United Nations reform, as well as its expertise and comparative advantage in operational support, WFP provides services and technical assistance to partners and governments benefitting both humanitarian and development responses, reducing duplication and fragmentation while freeing up resources to better and more efficiently serve the needs of populations.


Please answer the following questions:

  1. What do you think are the critical long term and future shifts that are transforming how WFP provide augmented services and advisory solutions?
  2. In that future, what WFP should do differently or better?

 

 

 

Comments (5)

Graan Jaff
Graan Jaff

Greetings, and welcome to this discussion room! 

My name is Graan Jaff, and work in WFP HQ, in the Supply Chain Operations division. I will be co-moderating this room, along with Cheryl, Amit, Andy, Giancarlo and Stephen. Our discussions will be focused on the theme of: Providing augmented services and advisory solutions (mandated and on demand).

This is a great opportunity to share your ideas, thoughts and views on how WFP can and should leverage its expertise in the broader area of service delivery.  

We have two questions to guide the conversations:

  1. What do you think are the critical long term and future shifts that are transforming how WFP provide augmented services and advisory solutions?
  2. In that future, what WFP should do differently or better?

Let us hear from you! We look forward to your active engagement.

 

Claudio Delicato
Claudio Delicato

Thanks Graan Jaff and looking forward to a fruitful discussion!

With a specific view on Service Provision (and this sort of addresses both questions), I believe WFP should aim to have a proper structure in place to manage such requests.

This does not only mean a staffing structure, but also the critical tools to be put in place to facilitate Service Provision, such as the establishment of a dedicated funding mechanism (e.g. a Special Account) to implement our Service Provision activities.

I see this working similarly to the GCMF, with WFP buying the food in advance (to capitalize on market opportunities to the maximum possible extent) and funds being revolved by requesting entities when food has been delivered (or is on its way to be delivered). This would enable value for money while speeding up food delivery.

The planning element would be critical, with agreements for Service Provision signed prior year start (to ensure an optimized use of funds based on when each agreement has to be implemented) and implemented throughout the year, while leaving enough financial availability to address additional incoming requests.

WFP's experience with the GCMF demonstrates that performance monitoring and reporting to key stakeholders/donors is a fundamental measure to show efficiency gains enabled by such mechanisms, and stimulate the humanitarian community to increasingly rely on WFP's Supply Chain expertise.

George Gegelia
George Gegelia

1. In my opinion, the main critical shift will come in enabling, we see more and more requirements for technical assistance to the governments. Few examples are already there WFP providing valuable technical support to the governments in the areas of Supply Chain, Procurement and VAM. one example is India where Supply Chain has been working closely with the CO to provide valuable advice on country wide food distribution systems, supply chains and final distributions especially in urban areas. 

2. Sustainable operations, especially in supply, chain will be another major direction to take. Working with smallholder farmers to achieve higher self sustainability and resilience will be the theme to follow. 

3. WFP would need to consolidate it's strength on emergency response and humanitarian operations. Provide better planning and better use of technologies for more efficient and flexible operations. For the foreseeable future emergency operations will be a major part of WFP operations. 

Andrew Odero
Andrew Odero

Just wanted to highlight of the need to think about consolidating the corporate strength in assessment and analysis during large-scale emergencies. I noticed for example during Idai, WFP was the key source of data that was used for programming decision-making but UNDAC was more visible as the leader, which should not be case as we have more boots on the ground and the analytical leadership. We should not let the analytical leadership in food and nutrition security fizzle away.

Magda Jurkowiecka
Magda Jurkowiecka

My thoughts - provision augmented services - absolutely. But not just as a service but as an activity contributing to recovery and economic growth. We have the structures and tools. Missing is design and measuring/evaluating logistics operations as a process and not as one-off services for different response activities (whether its in-kind operations or service provision for humanitarian community or enabling and capacity building). 

Conflict and natural disaster (and even pandemics) cause disruption in supply chains. People not only lose means to access to food but are also local food systems are disconnected from supply. We come in during emergencies and establish an emergency logistics network to deliver to save lives. For unknown reason, we measure only rations (or NFIs) delivered while logistics activities are considered only as a service to deliver. 

It’s understandable in short-term. But in medium to long-term – support of recovery of disrupted supply chains should be one of our priorities – an activity / not a service. The supply chain / logistics network is an integral part of the food system. Our logistics operations are not just a service for delivery of in-kind response - they are activities boosting transport sector, creating jobs and business opportunities contributing to economic growth. We need to design and evaluate them taking that into account. 

In example in emergency response we are great in fast mobilization of logistics set-up. Then we stall. We have operations relaying on storage in MSU for 10 years. No investment into structures because it’s just a service for in-kind assistance that we want to phase-out asap. And yet in contexts subject to regular crisis emergency reserves are critical. As we phase out from emergency into recovery we can invest into proper structures as part of long-term exit strategy where those structures are handed-over as emergency reserves and we provide capacity building. This may not be applicable everywhere but it's just an example where emergency response set-up over medium term can evolve into process of enabling providing a basis for investment into modernization to support logistics network and supply chains of food systems recovery and sustainability. 

My point:

1 / Logistics operations are not just a service for delivery of in-kind response - they are activities boosting transport sector, creating jobs and business opportunities contributing to economic growth.  We should design our logistics not just as an efficient (least costly) delivery mechanism but always with question in mind how it stimulates the economy that allows local population to find jobs, engages local production and business now and in the future.  And that should be reflected in the CSP.

2/ Emergency response set-up can shift to the process of enabling, providing a basis for investment into modernization.


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